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Tele-Therapy

October 8, 2019

I.P.C. comes directly to you. We are proud to offer tele-therapy services to clients seeking help who may not be able to make it to our clinic. You can access care from the comfort of your home, office, college dorm, or any secure location. I.P.C. is using the On-Call Health video platform which can be used from any device or mobile phone. On-Call Health uses an encrypted platform and meets all HIPAA standards for security and confidentiality.

Who is Tele-Therapy for?

  • Clients with schedules that are too busy to get away from the office
  • Clients with medical conditions preventing you from getting to our office
  • Couples or families who struggle to find times that work for everyone
  • Clients that simply prefer to do therapy from home
  • Clients who run into childcare, work conflicts, car problems, or weather concerns
  • Clients living in rural areas with limited services
  • Students going away to college somewhere in Minnesota
  • Clients with travel anxiety or agoraphobia

How Does it Work?

Simply contact our office to schedule your online tele-therapy session. You will re

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September 23, 2019

Spending and shopping are very socially acceptable in our society and advertisers work hard to convince us that buying things will make us happy. Many people are prone to social comparison and there is an allure to wanting what you see others have. Frankly for many, their possession become a measure of their self-esteem. Because of this thinking and mentality our culture abides by, it is only a small step further for those people with addictive personalities and tendencies to cross the line and develop a spending addiction. Although there is no official diagnosis for spending addiction and many experts disagree about whether it is a real disorder, it has been recognized as far back as the early 19th century. It is estimated that about 6% of the population may have a spending addiction, which often starts in their teens or early adulthood. With the advent of online shopping, spending is increasingly more available, accessible, and anonymous. We’ve seen increases in other behavioral addictions such as sex addiction, gaming, and gambling which have all flourished on the internet.

At present there is no unified set of symptoms or criteria for spending addiction, but we will discuss the common features and traits, many of which overlap with traditionally recognized addictions. Often, we see pe

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August 14, 2019

Bullying is when one person targets another person is smaller, younger, or weaker and tries to harm or humiliate them. Between 25-30% of students report being bullied. With many schools having anti-bullying initiatives and lower tolerance for such behavior, more bullying has moved to the internet in various social media outlets.

Many bullies lack parental consistency for normal aggression during ages 2 to 3 and these behaviors were never really curbed or corrected. They lack social skills, have little anxiety, and usually don’t understand how others feel. They struggle to interpret social exchanges and read aggression when there usually isn’t any and react aggressively. Bullies usually pick certain types of people to target. People who are bullied share some common traits and characteristics that include: being small in size, overweight, new to a school, dress differently, are unassertive, less popular, depressed or anxious, or may be annoying to others to name just a few.

The impact of bullying is difficult and sometimes long lasting. Most victims feel intense fear, anxiety, shame, humiliation, sadness, depression, stress and their concentration are affected. Many feel isolated, alienated, loss of self-esteem, decline in school performances, mi

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June 17, 2019

Perfectionism is a personality trait and cognitive mind set that causes people to fixate on details until they are absolutely just right. There is a big difference between aspiring and striving to your best (healthy) and unrelenting standards of perfection (unhealthy). Because perfection is unsustainable, unrealistic, and often unattainable, people are left feeling inadequate, unhappy, and feel like a failure.

There are three types of perfectionism. Probably the most common type of the self-oriented perfectionism. This is self-imposed and standards of perfection that you create for yourself. Alternatively, a person could end up with social prescribed perfectionism. With this type the person adopts the perceived expectations of others. This could be a child taking on a parent’s view to be perfect or the impact of social media channels and trying to live up to other’s standards. Lastly, is other oriented perfectionism where a person imposes perefectionistic standards on others.

Perfectionism is not a specific disorder by itself, but a character attribute that creates vulnerability or susceptibility to other problems. Trying to be perfect is very stressful and creates a lot of worry and anxiety from trying to live up to something that is unattainab

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June 3, 2019

Time management is the process of organizing activities in your life to determine which tasks have priority to you. Learning to manage your time better has a number of benefits. When time is allocated appropriately most people find the quality and efficiency of their work improves. Many people find greater balance in their life when they learn to budget time accordingly, which also helps reduce stress and free them for more self-care.

The average person experiences an interruption every 8 minutes, which is 7 times per hour, or 50-60 times a day. Most interruptions take an average of 5 minutes resulting in 3-4 hours of wasted time each day. Another interesting fact is that people with messy and cluttered desks spend an average of 1.5 hours per day looking for things and being distracted by stuff on their desk. Research also says that one hour of planning can save 10 hours of doing.

Part of the task in better time management is identifying barriers and obstacles. Some of these are internal and part of who you are, and others are external variables in the environment. For example internal variables that can hamper time management include perfectionism, stress and worry about other things in your life, a tendency to procrastinate, or a need to please an

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May 20, 2019

For most parents the only thing worse than talking to their teens about alcohol and drugs, is the sex talk. Comparatively, this should be a lot easier and we will try to help give you some tips and pointers. Nonetheless, having this talk is vitally important. Substance use is at its peak between 15 and 25 years old and this is the time when youth are most susceptible to developing lasting patterns for their use and at the highest risk for developing an addiction. Chemical use during these formative years also has a serious impact on their developing brains and bodies.

The dangers of chemical use in teens is well document and drives home the importance of talking with them. It is natural and appropriate for teens to want to begin to experiment and try out the roles of adulthood. This often includes the use of alcohol and drugs. Because adolescents is a time of great change, it is also a time of great stress. Just as many adults use chemicals to cope with stress, teens are at risk for using substances to cope with their stress. Here are some startling facts about the impact of chemicals on teen development. Alcohol abuse slows bone and muscle growth, can impair nonverbal abstract reasoning, perceptual motor skills, and reduce the ability to learn new information. Regular marijuana use can affect attenti

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April 25, 2019

Most of us feel like we are plagued with a variety of stressors at all times. To a great extent, you are both correct and not alone. Despite what you may think as you walk by strangers in the grocery store thinking, “Gee, they all look happy and fine. What am I doing wrong?” Just because people don’t have their issues tattooed on their foreheads, don’t assume they aren’t dealing with their own stressors. For most of us, life is a revolving door of stressors. It seems like just as soon as we unload a few, we pick up some more. This is reality for most people. On that note, let’s try not to plunge into depression, apathy, and hopelessness. The thing that differentiates those who are overwhelmed by their stressors and those who simply manage them, are a set of skills and coping strategies. Let discuss a few of them and see if we can get you in the right camp.

The first thing we need to be able to do is identify the source of the stressor. With this we need more than a general area such as work. We need the specifics such as I am overworked, under staffed, being harassed, in conflict with a coworker, etc. To tackle a stressor, we want to be able to get at the heart of it. When the plumber comes to your house, he doesn’t say, “Looks like your sink is leaking.” You could have figured that

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April 10, 2019

With a divorce rate around 50%, there are millions of people looking to form new relationships that have children of their own, or are dating someone with children from a previous relationship or marriage. The statistics show that 16% of children grow up in a blended family, which is has been pretty stable for the past 30 years. Prior to moving in and/or getting married there are some things to be mindful of that can help facilitate greater success down the road.

One thing that is crucial is to take the time for everyone to get acquainted and spend time together. There is no need to rush down the wedding isle, especially when blending families. It is upsetting for a child to feel like their new step parent is a complete stranger. Taking the time to build a relationship with kids can payoff greatly later on. During the stages of getting to know each other and even into marriage, the parenting approach is important. Most conventional wisdom suggests that the biological parent should be the one to perform any discipline that is needed, at least in the early stages. As the step parent your primary task to build a friendship and relationship with your partner’s children, and taking an authoritarian role often undermines these efforts, especially when it’s met with, “You’re not my mom/dad, you can

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March 13, 2019

The impact of divorce on children is well documented and discouraging, but there is hope and skillful ways to minimize the impact of divorce on children. On the concerning side, here are some startling facts. Adult children of divorced parents experience mental health problems significantly more often than do the adult children of intact families. The college attendance rate is about 60 percent lower among children of divorced parents compared with children of intact families. Divorce has been found to be associated with a higher incidence of depression, withdrawal from friends and family; aggressive, impulsive, or hyperactive behavior; and either withdrawing from participation in the classroom or becoming disruptive. Daughters of divorced parents tend to divorce more frequently than do the sons of divorced parents, with the risk as much as 87 percent higher during the earlier years of marriage.

The facts presented above are not intended to discourage the thousands of men and women, who through no fault of their own are divorced or planning to divorce. Instead, these facts are shared as a reminder to those who are married or are considering getting married that divorce carries with it many potentially harmful and life changing consequences for everyone involved. The impact on children is not to be take

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February 25, 2019

One of the great stressors in life is dealing with difficult people. By definition a difficult person is anyone whose words or action evoke unwanted and unpleasant feelings in you. Before you start making a laundry list of the people you know, remember that we all have a difficult side. Sometimes despite our best efforts, we are only a couple steps away from becoming a case study in an article like this about difficult people. One thing to remember is that most difficult people are temporarily working from a negative side of their personality and are not consciously trying to be difficult. These people are often swept up in their own emotions and are unaware of their tone of voice, body language and behaviors towards others.

Knowing the type of difficult person you are dealing with can be helpful in situations and determines the steps you might take. Steam blowers are people who are upset with a particular outcome or situation and are generally not difficult people on a regular basis. Bullies routinely use aggression to get what they want. Pot stirrers enjoy instigating discord and use passive aggressive methods of expressing their dislikes and upsets. Attention seekers routinely interrupt or may come off as a know it all. Moaners and blamers tend to be negative, find the shortcomings in things and su

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